The Surge

Yocum Falls near Mount Hood Oregon

The Surge - Below the creek was cold from the melted snow that flowed into it no more than two more miles upstream and it was swift from the rain coming down from above. Standing in the creek seemed to be the best approach to this waterfall, so I pull my Wiggy's Waders on over my boots and rain pants and take my tripod and camera into the stream.

In front of me is the surging waterfall that seemed to send a steady mist toward me spraying the filter on the lens with drops that would accumulate in a matter of seconds. The best approach was to clean the lens with the camera pointed downstream, cover the lens with the rag, swing the camera around, remove the rag, take the shot and spin it back again in a vain attempt at trying to keep the drops out of the photo.

In time I was able to get the focus and the composition set so that when I could perceive the slightest slack in the breeze I could do my spin, reveal and shoot procedure described above. With that methodology, I was able to come home with a photograph.

This was made using my Nikon D810 and my 20mm f/2.8 - 1/8 sec - f/16 - 1000 Iso

Amazing White River Falls & Celestial Falls Oregon

White River Falls Oregon

White River Falls and Celestial Falls Oregon

White River Falls in the background and Celestial Falls in the foreground on the White River near the town of Tygh Valley Oregon.

White River has its source on the southeast side of Mount Hood and its terminus at its confluence with the Deschutes River just north of the town of Maupin.  It's located about 35 miles south of The Dalles.

At the base of the falls is an old abandoned hydroelectricity generation plant which was active from 1910 to 1960.

You can learn more at the Oregon State Parks website.

 

 

Panther Creek Falls Washington

Panther Creek Falls

Panther Creek Falls Washington during high water.

It was a great day to visit this waterfall. I had tried to drive to the trail two weeks prior and was stopped by fallen trees and unmelted snow. In the meantime the road had been cleared and so Darlene and I decided to drive up and give it a look. I'm glad that we did. With the high Spring runoff from the snow and the rain has made the creeks and waterfalls very full and powerful. This particular waterfall has areas to the right side of the normal fall that become a water curtain when the water becomes high. These were the conditions that I sought.

As I approached the falls the view through the trees was breathtaking as it appeared as a soft, bright diffused veil of water past shadows from the trees. When I broke through the trees and walked down to the water's edge the mist was soaking. I had to cover my gear to keep it reasonably dry. The rocks were very slippery and because I was down there alone didn't push my limits much.

The compositions from there are a little bit limited but conditions make a big difference, and this amazing curtain of water at the right side of the main falls, which is not there in normal water flow, was pretty incredible and made a unique photo for this location. The sun and the mist would play on each other as each one changed in time.

Just a quick word about photographing this location. Be aware that there's a viewing platform at the top of the falls that most folks view this scene from. The more adventurous and capable can take a steep and slippery slop to the bottom, but please beware if you attempt this, especially when it's wet.

 

Oregon Rain Forest

Oregon Rain Forest

The Oregon Rain Forest - This photograph speaks of what Oregon means to me. My earliest memories are of sitting at the edge of an Oregon creek fishing for trout with my father and the smell of the forest and the sound of the creek as it tumbles over the top of mossy rocks and logs. It hasn't mattered where I have been in the world in my life Oregon was still home to me. These creek side memories had a lot to do with my yearning to return home. They're a peaceful place and make wonderful landscape photos.

This photograph was taken in the Mt Hood National Forest near the little town of Rhododendron Oregon. It was made on May 21st of 2016. This shows the lush green moss covered forest at it's Springtime prime.  It's a time of the year that the forest is the most alive. It's as if everything that lives there is celebrating the warmer weather and the passing of Winter. Everything from the smallest insect to the largest bear, moss to trees they all are reaching for the light. It's the lushest and the greenest. The creeks are full and the leaves fill the voids of every corner and every gully. I love photographing the forest in the Spring time.

This shot was made with my Nikon D810 with a 24-85 f/3.5. The exposure was 0.8 sec at an aperture of f/20 and 800 ISO. I used a polarizing filter to reduce glare. Raw conversion was in Lightroom with basic exposure and contrast adjustments, lens correction, CA correction and basic sharpening and NR, and the processing was then finished in Photoshop with a thin Orton layer and final sizing and sharpening.

Contact me for photography instruction including private workshops for camera operation or processing.

 

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