What to Look For In A Camera For Any Skill Level

I'm often asked, "What kind of camera do you recommend?" I'm not so sure that those who ask that one simple question actually understand just how many questions that it can generate in reply.

Cell Phone Camera

Cell Phone Camera

There's the old adage that, the best camera is the one that you have with you, and a lot can be said for that. Capturing a moment in time is easily served well by modern cell phones. Most of the time the photos that are made are perfectly acceptable. With a little experience and an application or two and an Instagram account one can call it good and their photographic needs are taken care of. Not long ago if someone wanted a simple camera they would get a Point and Shoot but today cell phones have taken that role.

Because cell phones have their limitations, if a person wants to be able to take a little better quality photo, especially in challenging light or fast action, they can choose some excellent cameras today that make the pro models from years past look primitive. Even at entry and bridge camera levels. A bridge camera, or prosumer camera, is one that gives the user the ability to either shoot in automatic, programmed modes or manual mode. Generally speaking they don't have interchangeable lenses but have a large zoom range. Some offer from 24-1000mm equivalent focal length zoom capabilities. These cameras usually run from around $300 - $1000, with the average around $500-600 dollars and cover the majority of the needs of the average consumer or hobbyist.

The next step up the the progression of abilities are the Single Lens Reflex cameras. The majority of serious hobbyists or professional photographers will want to own a DSLR camera because of their increased capabilities such as more control, larger file sizes for larger printing, lower light capabilities, better lenses etc. I tell anyone who is considering buying a DSLR camera that if they don't plan on learning how to use it on any other setting than Auto to not bother with the expense as the Bridge cameras will give you the equivalent image. An entry level DSLR can cost as little as $500 for the camera body with lenses additional, up to $6000 - $8000 for a pro model with a myriad of costs and models between. I will discuss the differences in the different types of DSLR cameras in a future article.

Digital SLR

Digital SLR

It is important to note that technology marches on and in the next few years we can see a shift in the camera paradigm since the Japanese 35mm film SLR's came to the consumer market in the 1950's. The next big thing in cameras is the elimination of the mirror mechanism that's the main part of the single lens reflex camera. The mirrorless cameras have no moving parts and the sensor controls the exposure. Another benefit is that they are smaller and lighter. Manufactures such as Sony, Fuji and Panasonic are leading the way while, oddly, the big guys Canon and Nikon seem to be dragging their feet at this time, but it's logical that all of the other will follow suit soon.

To get back to my original statement about the best camera is the one that you have with you. I always tell anyone who wants to use a camera as a hobby to create artistic images that it matters little the type of camera. I have made beautiful photos with a wooden pinhole camera and 120 film. A pinhole camera is, essentially, a box with a little hole in the front. The photographer uncovers the hole for a moment to expose the film and then covers it again. I have made some photos with an old Brownie Hawkeye that would rival a Hasselblad. Don't use the excuse that you don't have a good camera to start taking photos. Use what you have. Learn how to use it. Learn what good and bad light is. Learn a few composition rules and practice. Learning photography is like any skill. It takes a lot of practice. And the true art of photography doesn't depend on cost or complexity of the paintbrush. There's a lot to be said about using gear that is more suited to your skill level and growing to the point where the camera's limitations are limiting your own. I always say that a pair of fancy golf shoes or an expensive titanium driver is not going to help my golf game. If I were a pro or a very good hobbyist, maybe. Β 

I have not addressed or endorsed a recommended brand. There's no reason to choose one over the other. Arguing about Canon or Nikon is like arguing about Ford or Chevy. It's all about personal preference. The brands do what brands do. They leap frog each other to try to have the best. We all win because of it. The main reason that a person chooses one brand over the other is the user interface or lens selection. And once you choose a brand and invest in a few lenses, one has little incentive to change brands just to buy a whole new set of lenses, which is indeed something to consider when choosing a brand.

I should also mention that if you are an old film fan you can still purchase film and have it developed, but, sadly they have taken our Kodachrome away!

I hope that this gives you a little bit of information to allow you to decide on which camera might be right for you. I am always available to answer questions either here at my blog or on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

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Dale rose christner says:

Thank you Gary for answering some basic questions we had. We look forward to your posts😊

Profile photo of Gary Randall Gary Randall says:

Hi Dale. πŸ™‚ Thank you for your comment. I’m glad that the information helped.

Very down to earth article and encouraging. Appreciate your titanium comparison. Have a nice reel that I hardly ever use.

Profile photo of Gary Randall Gary Randall says:

Thank you very much Louis. πŸ™‚ I appreciate that.

Val Drake says:

Well written Gary. I am happy for you and this news column!

Profile photo of Gary Randall Gary Randall says:

Hi Val. πŸ™‚ Thank you. !!

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